Rehoming A Puppy: Is There An Ideal Age? · Boudreaux Kennel

Table of Contents

Rehoming A Puppy: Is There An Ideal Age?

Rehomed puppies need to adjust to their new home. It’s an unfamiliar environment, and this may stress them out as well as scare them. Many newly rehomed puppies act withdrawn until they’ve gotten used to their surroundings. This is why many veterinary experts and pet trainers have a recommended age for taking a puppy home.

What’s the ideal age for bringing a puppy home? Why does it make a difference? Keep reading to learn more about how puppy age makes a difference, and also how to help your new puppy adapt!

What’s The Best Age For Rehoming A Puppy?

According to pet breeders and veterinarians, the best age for bringing a puppy home is when they’re 8 to 10 weeks old. While puppies can be taken home at younger ages in emergency situations, there are distinct advantages to waiting.

What’s The Best Age For Rehoming A Puppy? · Boudreaux Kennel

Puppies learn socialization skills from their littermates, such as play behavior and communication. They’ll know bite inhibition and how to interact with other dogs. They’ll also be weaned from their mothers when they’re older, reducing their stress as they eat solid food in your home. This is also still young enough for them to start forming strong bonds with their owners and the people in their new home.

Note that the older a puppy is when you rehome them, they may have already developed submissive or dominant behaviors from their littermates. This can cause behavioral problems down the line. However, if they’re too young, they’re likely to have behavioral problems too. Puppies rehomed too early may display aggression, anxiety, or fearfulness. These will take extra love and training to overcome.

Different Dogs May Have Different Circumstances

Puppies can be taken home as young as 8 weeks old. However, some breeders wait until they’re a bit older. This is especially true for toy breeds, as they’re very small and fragile.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Boudreaux Kennel (@toy.poodles)

You should also consider if your new puppy will be traveling a long distance from their old home. In this case, it may be better to wait until they’ve gotten older and have most of their vaccinations. This will boost their immune system, as well as reduce the stress of traveling.

How You Can Help Your Puppy Adapt To Their New Home?

Worried about making your new puppy feel safe and cozy in their new furr-ever home? Here are a few simple tips that you can try to help them adjust.

  • Make Sure You Have Everything You Need
    Purchase only what’s necessary! I strongly disagree when it comes to buying unnecessary things for the puppy  or not quite essentials like: paw wipes, ridiculously expensive dog beds, special dog drying towels, tremendous amount of dog toys and so on. There is nothing wrong with spoiling your furkid but there are better ways to do it.

    As for us, we always provide access to our Basic Shopping List at least 3 weeks before rehoming. This will give the family a rough idea on what are the important things to buy and gives them enough time to disinfect them before rehoming a puppy.
  • Plan Rehoming during Daytime
    Experts suggest rehoming a puppy during daytime is best, because dogs tend to feel more anxious or stressed at night.
  • Help Them Find A Safe Corner
    Let them explore your home a little and find a space they find comfortable. When you’ve figured out which spot they keep retreating to, set their bed there. When they’re overwhelmed or stressed, they’ll feel safer in that haven.
  • Act Confidently Around Them
    Many puppies have a naturally fearful stage. Coddling or immediately soothing them may reinforce this fearfulness. Instead, act playful, confident, and cheerful around them so they realize everything’s fine!
  • Give the Puppy Some Space
    Even after you let them explore. Why? they need at least a few days for them to settle in and they need to slowly decompress at their own pace. Please do not get discourage if your Poodle doesn’t warm up to you on the first night. Just like us, they have different personalities. Your Poodle can adjust to his new home in an hour, or it might take months.
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

12 Comments
Most Voted
Newest Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

Table of Contents

Like & Follow Us

"When your heart belongs to a Poodle, every day is a tail-wagging celebration."

Related Posts

Recent Comments

There are 107 approved comments so far. Many thanks!

Latest Instagram Post

Ruffly Speaking

Previously Rehomed Puppies

Sponsored Ad

error: Content is protected !!